Screening at Houses of Parliament

On the 11th July 2017 MY LIFE AS A BULLY, was screened at The Houses of Parliament

Click the link below to see what M.P. for Aberavon, Stephen Kinnock says about the film

 

Stephen Kinnock MP

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MY LIFE AS A BULLY, had a screening in Parliament

MY LIFE AS A BULLY SCREENED IN PARLIAMENT

Youngsters from Dyffryn Comprehensive have visited Parliament for a special screening of My Life As A Bully. The event, hosted by local MP Stephen Kinnock, showcased the locally made film starring pupils from the school. The mockumentary deals with the issue of bullying and how it affected those who are exposed to it.

Mr Kinnock supported and helped Firehorse Productions with the project and was delighted to welcome the youngsters to Parliament:
“Dyffryn youngsters and Firehorse Productions have produced a truly ground breaking drama, and it was a real privilege for me to be able to host this special screening, showcasing to my Parliamentary colleagues the amazing talent that we have here in Aberavon.
“My Life As A Bully delivers a powerful and thought-provoking anti-bullying message, and it left my parliamentary colleagues moved and inspired.”
The film was written and directed by Denise Francis of Firehorse Productions which is based in Aberavon:
“We are thrilled to have such great support for the film. Bullying is still an issue that pervades our schools, and for those that suffer from bullying, the after-effects can often follow them into adult life.

“Our message is that everyone; teacher, student, parent, bystander, can play an important role in tackling bullying, and we should all ensure that we do everything we can to support those who need us.”

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The film was shot at Dyffryn Comprehensive and used pupils from the school to play the roles.

For more information on My Life As A Bully visit http://firehorsefilm.com/product/my-life-as-a-bully/

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MP pops in to Firehorse – All action

Set 3

Stephen Kinnock has always been very supportive of our Anti Bullying work, so we popped his name on the clapperboard

We discussed our film work and have even promised him a cameo in our next project

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Second Review of MY LIFE AS A BULLY

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Movie News, Movie Trailers, Film Reviews, Short Film Reviews & More | Screen Critix

My Life as a Bully (2016) short film review

February 26, 2017 By Carl Burgess

Tackling the important subject of bullying and how it affects those who are exposed to it, we review the short educational film “My Life as a Bully”.

Bullying has always been around, especially in schools. Children can be picked on by others for their ethnicity, the colour of their hair, what possessions they own (or don’t own) or for simply being in the wrong place at the wrong time. News reports are popping up on a regular basis in regards to children taking their own lives due to being victims of bullies. It’s a problem that needs to be tackled and eradicated.

Shot in the style of a mockumentary (think The Office), My Life as a Bully takes place in a secondary school in Port Talbot, with the Head Teacher (Peter Morgan Barnes) allowing a camera crew to shoot the goings on in the classrooms and playgrounds. We soon get to meet Bulldog (Paul Britton) and his gang of fellow bullies, who think nothing of taking money and electronic devices from younger children. They turn their attention to Booker (Kate Spencer), a smart student who decides that enough is enough and looks for a way to stop the bullying epidemic completely, with the help of a new library assistant (Richard Compton) and a mysterious book on bullying by an author going by the name of I. Dexham.

The book changes Booker’s life and soon the lives of all the children who attend the same school, including Bulldog and his gang.

My Life as a Bully looks and plays out as a very professional production. It is shot nicely and the audio is crisp throughout. Additional points are also earned for using the awe-inspiring track “The Way” by Zack Hemsey to help drive home the emotional scenes.

The performances by the actors are all excellent, even though I was a little confused at first as to why adults were playing the roles of school children, but it certainly works.

Denise Francis, along with producer Christine Evans and assistant producer Matthew Wren Andrew have created an excellent short film with an important message. A film that should be shown in schools around the world and who knows, it could be a catalyst for change.

Let’s hope so.                                        4.5 / 5 stars

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 CRITICALLY SPEAKING

THEATRE, FILM AND EVERYTHING INBETWEEN.

My Life as a Bully – 19.02.17

BY JAFAR IQBAL ON FEBRUARY 19, 2017

Denise Francis writes and directs My Life as a Bully, a 40-minute educational drama aimed at children between seven and thirteen. Part drama, part mockumentary, the Firehorse Film production explores the bullying going on in a fictional Welsh secondary school. Booker is just one of the many kids in her school getting harassed by Bulldog, but things start to change when she’s given a book about bullying by her librarian.

Bullying is, of course, no laughing matter, so the decision to tackle such a sensitive subject with humour is a brave one. Fortunately, the film manages to pull it off. Relying on wit rather than light entertainment, the script offers moments that have tongue firmly in cheek without trivialising the issue itself. The comedy works best when it comes organically – certain sequences feel far too contrived but, arguably, they may be perfectly fine for the target audience.

But it’s in its more serious moments that My Life as a Bully really excels. Hannah Compton gives a powerful performance as Hannah, Bulldog’s chief victim. There’s melancholy in her portrayal of the helpless pupil, and the viewer is genuinely rooting for her to break free. She gets solid support from Kate Spencer (as Booker) and Paul Britton (as Bulldog) but, as good as all three performances are, it’s very obvious that these are adults playing children. The film would arguably be more impactful with actors at the right ages, but the leads are nonetheless a solid cast.

But, ultimately, the message of the film is what stands out. Bullying is an issue that we have all been affected by (many of us directly), so Firehorse need to be commended for its efforts to raise awareness. Sequences in the film are very relatable, and it’s hard not to be moved by them. There may be flaws in the film’s narrative and creative decisions, but what My Life is a Bully is trying to achieve cannot be doubted. It’s an important film, and a well-made one at that.

A clever mix of comedy and drama is enough to create a moving piece on bullying in schools

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